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20120929
20121007
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 11:00pm PDT
from new york, denver los angeles and washington. president obama and governor romney faced off tonight in the first of three debates before election day on november 6th. domestic policy was in focus during the 90-minute showdown at the university of denver. the platform gave govern romney an opportunity to reignite his campaign which has suffered some this summer. they sparred across a range of issues. >> there's a various done of small businesses across the country saying what's the effect of obamacare in your hiring plans. three quarters said it makes us less likely to hire people. i just don't know how the president could come into office, facing 23 million people out of work, rising unemployment and economic crises at the kitchen table, and spend his energy and passion for two years fighting for obamacare instead of fighting for jobs for the american people. >> the irony is that we've seen this model work really well, in massachusetts. because govern romney did a good thing, working with democrats in the state to set up what is essentially the identical model, and as a consequence,
PBS
Oct 2, 2012 5:30pm PDT
obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investin
PBS
Oct 1, 2012 9:00pm PDT
and not obama had promised to increase defense spending. only 23% were aware that payroll taxes had decreased during obama's term in office. only slightly more than half knew that paul ryan is the republican vice presidential nominee. the director of the annenberg center, kathleen hall jamieson, our master media decoder is back with us. welcome. >> thank you. >> so who's responsible for the widespread unawareness or ignorance that you report in your survey? is it the candidate, the media, or the voter? >> it's all three. and fortunately, we have the opportunity with presidential debates to do something that reliably increases knowledge. we've been studying presidential debates for a long time as a scholarly community. and to our surprise, we consistently find that those who watch debates, regardless of the level of knowledge they come in with, come out with more accurate knowledge as a general group. and they do this because those who haven't paid a great deal of attention have a lot to learn. those of us who've paid a lot of attention still missed things. the news may have covered something
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 11:00pm PDT
youill and very vague about the stick. >> obama is brilliant in a speech, a peach is different than when you are in an argument and when you are in an argument if you don't bring passion to your argument the other side is generally going to win and what you say almost matters as much as how you say it, and the scary thing about politics is, substance aside, you know, a lot of the journalist whose know the substance on these issues are debating with themselves who was more accurate and who was not. when you listen to the person in the street, the voter, the juror who i speak to, they say i understood romney, i didn't understandbama i liked romney's style, i didn't like the president laying down. >> rose: we conclude this evening with barbara, a computer scientist and author, her book on voting heens is called broken ballots, will your vote count. >> we want americans to know a great democracy deserves a great voting system and right now we have a third grade voting system which is just not worthy of our democracy, we are also very concerned that if there is a very close election or multip
PBS
Oct 4, 2012 5:30pm PDT
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama questioned whether the real mitt romney was at last night's debate-- a criticism romney's spokesman dismissed as damage control. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we et the latt on the candidates' appearances today, as they reprised last night's messages about jobs and the economy. >> brown: plus, we have our own debate on the differing approaches to taxes and deficit reduction. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the war in syria, as skirmishes spill over the border with turkey for a second day in a row. >> brown: we come back to last night's debate with two takes on how it was received. ray suarez talked to voters in the swing state of florida. >> i didn't hear what i need to about jobs. that is the number one interest of generally everyone in the united states. >> woodruff: and in our regular "daily download" segment, margaret warner explores how the face off played in social media. >> brown: and it hasn't happened in baseball in 45 years. we lo
PBS
Sep 28, 2012 10:00pm PDT
of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of late, and the president may be getting a boost from voter attitudes. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll out last week found 42% of americans think the economy will improve in the next year. that's six points higher than a month ago. 18% say the economy will worsen, and almost a third expect it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were nearly 400,000 more jobs created in the previous year that ended in march. that would mean that there are a higher number of jobs than when president obama took office. but t
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 6:00pm PDT
" coverage of the first presidential debate between president barack obama and former governor mitt romney. i'm again ifil. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. tonight's debate will be moderated by our own jim leerer and will start a little over a minute from now, from the magness arena. >> after the debate we'll talked to arrow shapiro and scott horsily in denver, and christina bellantony. >> woodruff: you can follow along online on our live stream and live plog. two very quick thoughts from mark and david. mark, it come downs to this. >> in a rare race it's become increasingly a referendum on the challenger rather than the incumbent. can the challenger mitt romney make this a referendum on the president. >> who has the toughest job? >> romney. maybe jim lehrer. format i love. much more demanding on jim but better for us. >> ifill: we're looking forward to what jim has to say tonight. it's a big night and we'll go to the convention hall and hoar from our own jim lehrer. >> lehrer: good evening, from the ma nag mess arena in colora. i welcome you to the first of the 2012 presidential debates
PBS
Oct 3, 2012 4:30pm PDT
happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that firms have stopped cutting jobs. the bad news is they're still too nervous to hire more than a handful of new workers. friday, economists predict the september employment report will show a modest 113,000 new positions were added, barely better than august. still, some believe current data underestimates what's really happening with hiring. >> the perception of the labor market is probably more like a world where we're adding 150,000 jobs a month, which isn't good, but certainly better than the numbers are printing which is only around 100,000 or so. >> reporter: anecdotal evidence supports that assessment too. this new york staffing firm primarily places workers in administrative jobs, and says it's finding the market surprisingly strong. today, good candidates are quickly turning temporary positions into full time jobs.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)